Wednesday, April 20, 2011

In early 2010, a "Social Sentry" service was launched to allow employers to monitor associate's "homemade" online activity; is it still around?

In March 2010, there were a number of news stories about a product called “Social Sentry” introduced by a company named Teneros (link).  The product allegedly could monitor public online activity by associates, even when using aliases, from home or anywhere with public Internet access as well as at work. It’s likely that the focus of monitoring would be to track the leak of trade secrets or of unfavorable comments made about the company or customers online (especially on but not limited to social networking sites).  In a sense, it sounds like a corporate “online reputation defender”.

As I noted on my “IT Jobs” blog yesterday, employers might be concerned that employee comments show that they are not serious about staying in their jobs or are distracted by conflicts.

One of the biggest stories was on Fiercecio, here.

Another good story was on Trends Updates. “We only provide the application and the software. It is up to companies to decide what to do with it.”

I could not find any reference to the product on the Teneros site today, and a PDF document turned up by Bing is no longer there. Various other files on the site give 404’s or “unauthorized’ messages.  It’s not clear from what I found that the product is still offered.

Will other products come out to help employers monitor off-duty social media and self-publishing sites?  Will they take the position that anything accessible to a search engine is “public”?  Would the use of privacy settings matter?

A service like this could provide verification that the "right person" is identified, which is a big problem with surreptitious Internet "background investigations" of job applicants and even active employees. This is likely to remain an ongoing issue.

Update:  See the reader's comment. The link given is this. Note the "anywhere monitoring."

1 comment:

daniel said...

Social Sentry is alive and well. The technology was acquired by SocialLogix and is now in its second release with new analytics, archiving and monitoring capability. Visit www.sociallogix.com for more info.